How to Apply For a Job Online – Tips For Newbies

Freelancing is another thing for professional exchange of work or projects on freelancing websites for people who are finding freelance jobs online. Getting connected, discussing the project details and if both the employer and the freelance employee agrees the charge to complete the work is decided. Here, the freelance workers need to market their skills in a quick and efficient manner to show that why are they the best for the aforesaid work. It is on the will of the freelancer to find freelance jobs online according to their own comfort as well as suitability. The leverage also remains with the freelancing professional for choosing the best of out of all offered projects. The budget remains negotiable between both the parties and on completion of work the reward is facilitated as decided.

Though it is not tough today to find freelance jobs online as there are many sites supporting freelancers and also helping the clients to get in touch with the experts of their own field. But there is a very wide variety of work present for freelancing, each individual needs to decide one particular field to work on as no one can bridge the capacity of dual or triple field working.

Majorly, today people bid on designing, writing, content editing, proof reading, copy writing, data entry, data analysis and many other projects to work on. To find freelance jobs online, you need to register yourself with freelancing websites that help you get in touch with the clients, getting to know their demanded project and bidding on it. The skills one can work on as a freelancer is endless and so are the opportunities. There are different ways to carry a freelance task, some projects pay you for your hourly basis working with the company, others need you to complete the given project. You can charge the client accordingly and as for the payment as it suits you, either online or through cheque also.

Working as a freelancer to find freelance jobs online require you to have a profile on freelancing websites and create your profile there with all your authentic details and your portfolio, it is the place where you can display your skills and can stand apart other freelance workers. The online system will help you to find good jobs here. Your complete profile, an updated CV and required brushed skills will always earn you brownie points as a freelancing professional.

Partnetpro brings you a step closer and gets you introduced with the best clients where you can find online freelance jobs and pitch excellent work as a freelancer in any field.

There’s Hidden Value In The ‘Nice Factor’ When Negotiating – Negotiation Tip of the Week

“I don’t know why I made those concessions. The other negotiator was so nice! Something made me want to be nice in return.” Unbeknownst to the speaker of those words, subliminally, he was affected by the nice factor.

Have you ever considered the hidden value of the nice factor when negotiating? Being nice is perceptional, depending on who you’re negotiating with. Nevertheless, it has a place at some point in every negotiation.

The following are ways you can deploy the settle ally of the nice factor to enrich your negotiation outcomes.

Positioning:

Negotiators set the tone for the negotiation at its outset. Note: The outset starts before you’re at the negotiation table. They may set a tone to suggest you should not take them lightly or one that implies they’ll go along to get along.

Some negotiators project a stern persona to convey the sentiment that they’re not to be dallied with; this persona can also be invoked to protect the veneer of insecurity. That’s worth mentioning because you should be watchful and asses if such a demeanor serves that purpose. That can uncover the personality type that you’re really dealing with.

In some cases, a stern type of projected positioning is advantageous. But, if you don’t consider the negotiation style of your negotiation counterpart, it can be the uncoupling of the negotiation before it starts. Thus, you should be mindful of the persona you project at the beginning stages and throughout a negotiation. You don’t want to turn the other negotiator into a more abstinent opponent if he’s not already one. If such occurs, attempt to mollify him by modifying your demeanor. Be nicer.

Soft Negotiators:

Soft negotiators will display their demeanor by presenting a broad smile upon meeting you and a handshake that is appropriate for the encounter (i.e. not too hard, not too soft). As you engage in the negotiation, assess to what degree this may be a façade. You can accomplish that by noting the slight changes in her personality when discussing points of disagreements. If she’s quick to placate you, make sure you let her win points, too. Doing that will enhance the nice factor.

Hard Negotiators:

Hard negotiators may present more of a challenge when attempting to invoke the nice factor. Depending on the degree of their hardness, moderate to obnoxious, the nice factor may not be appropriate. Instead, you may want to adopt a persona that matches the style of the other negotiator to get him to modify his demeanor. If he does, at that point you may consider implementing the nice factor. Depending on the severity of his modification, being nice can serve as his reward.

Negotiation Reset:

Most negotiators don’t like strong tensions in a negotiation. When tensions reach a certain level, negotiators tend to be more dogmatic about the positions they’ve adopted. So, if you find yourself in such a contention, consider employing the nice factor. This may be in the form of making a concession. If you’re not sure if doing that will ease tensions, preface your offer with an ‘if’ statement (e.g. If I do this, will you do ‘x’?). The point of using the nice factor at this point will be an attempt to reset the negotiation to a less pretentious position.

The more positive the experiential endowment you invoke within the other negotiator, the easier the flow of the negotiation will be. That will lend itself to an enhanced negotiation engagement, which in turn should lead to a greater negotiation outcome for you… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

“Body Language Secrets To Win More Negotiations” will allow you to gain insight as to how you can negotiate better by being able to read the other negotiator’s body language. In addition, the book goes deep into new negotiation strategies that you can use to disarm your negotiation opponent and increase your negotiation win rates.

Apollo Intensa Emozione – The Apollo IE

At the 2016 Geneva Motor Show, Apollo was ready to show off its new direction with the Arrow concept. Yet, here we are 19 months later, and the company’s first real product, the “Intensa Emozione” is nothing like that idea. That’s because they’ve done a lot in order to be able to push the design well beyond what the original Apollo’s chassis could take.

After turning the Gumpert-based Apollo N into a functional track car by completely re-engineering its guts, Norman came to the conclusion that the tubular chromoly space frame Gumpert has designed was not something they could work with in the long run. Then, it was decided that they would switch to a naturally-aspirated V 12 instead of a twin-turbo Sixth is v 8 as well.

Once they were done looking at the new blank sheet, Apollo moved forward simply by teaming up with Paolo Garella, the engineer whose recent works include Scuderica Cameron Clickenhaus’ race framework for the SCG 003. Based on what they’ve learnt from Glickenhaus’ In ürburgring program, Garella’s Manifattura Automobili Torino built an even tighter carbon fiber framework, happy to become free from the packaging issues associated with forced-induction engines, but still challenged by the style team to fit both a Sixth is v doze and a 26. 4 gallon fuel cell, all without compromising balance.

The result is an all co2 chassis with a carbon monocoque, as well as carbon fiber front and rear subframes, plus crash structures that are neatly integrated into the exterior design. The platform weighs just 231 lbs., allowing the Apollo IE to claim a curb weight figure of 2755 pounds., having a distribution of 45/55 per cent front and rear.

The IE sits on a 106 inch wheelbase, with an overall length of 16. 5 feet. It’s also almost two meters wide at 6. 5 feet, while its ride height can be hydraulically adjusted between 60 and 160mm. The standard road setting is usually 110m m. The adjustable dampers come from Bilstein, while the rest of the suspension is definitely a double wishbone setup with full push-rod and rocker arm architecture at both ends, along with flexible anti-roll bars.

For those hard days at the circuit, the IE also comes with a pneumatic quick-lift system with four air-jacks. Supporting the action are Apollo’s co2 ceramic Brembo brakes with 6-piston calipers at the front side and four-pistons in the back, barely hidden behind forged aluminum BBS rims.

Tuned to produce 780 horsepower in 8500 rpm and 560 foot pounds of torque found at 6000 rpm, Apollo’s six. 3 V12 is a variety of the Ferrari F12’s engine, with fresh software, plus a custom intake and exhaust system developed by Autotecnica Motori in Italy. It revs to 9000, while the tach goes to 11.

The V12 uses a paddle-shift operated Hewland 6-speed race gearbox. In the meantime, Apollo can be likewise working on a dual-clutch automatic for its future cars, like the upcoming Arrow set for a 2019 debut.

There’s a 12-level traction control program as well mainly because three driving modes to keep things tidy, but the lack of turbos about the blue-blooded V12 promises old school thrills in a car packing 2976 lbs. of downforce at 186 mph.

Yet despite almost all the engineering, the Apollo IE’s most fascinating feature remains its exterior style, which was the function of two guys in their late twenties, operating from home. Yes. This car was created in a 27-year-old’s living room.

A2 Motorcycle License Holders Should Consider The Benelli TRK502

As a motorcycle tour operator, I’d like to think that our marketing material makes it clear what we do, nevertheless, over the years I’ve operated I’ve had many unusual requests. Although loosely related to motorcycle touring, the common thread of these non-standard requests is, they are invariably from people who don’t have a motorcycle license; something that should be a foregone conclusion as being a prerequisite for participating in a motorcycle tour.

An example of these requests was “Granny will be 90 on her birthday and she has never been on a motorcycle but we want to make it a special day for her, so, can you take her pillion on a tour”. Declining any business is always a difficult decision although we try to do so in a polite manner and make some sensible suggestions for an alternative gift.

Although it is rare we have had requests from riders who hold an A2 license. We have to advise these riders to bring their own bike. However, the practicalities of this can be too great a challenge for the inexperienced rider as they might need to ride a thousand miles just to reach the tour start and perhaps another thousand miles home at the end. Naturally we would rather not put a rider at potential risk asking them to side so far especially with a deadline to meet but few can afford or justify several weeks off for a biking holiday and so attempt to cover high mileages each day between home and tour location arriving invariably exhausted before the real trip has even begun.

I had recent spate of unfortunate incidents that began whilst travelling to Fort Augustus to research a tour when I incurred a rear puncture. Roadside attempts at a repair had proven ineffective and so I called the RAC who collected the bike and took it to Inverness where a new tyre was fitted. The following day when returning to Ft Augustus from the Isle of Skye my gear change leaver snapped off! I can only speculate that when strapped into the van on its journey to Inverness that a strap must have been placing pressure on the leaver and perhaps weakened it. Anyway, a bit of road side emergency repair with some gaffer tape (always carry some!) soon got the gear changer working again enough to complete the research trip and get back to Glasgow.

On my return, I ordered a new changer through a local family run Benelli, Kawasaki, Royal Enfield and Sym dealership albeit my ride is a Triumph but I use them because they also service, maintain and MOT all brands of motorcycle. A few days later they advised that the part was in stock and when I arrived they offered to fit it for me. Whilst in the shop I was drawn to the Benelli TRK502 an adventure bike specifically targeted towards the A2 license holder and daily commuters. Brand new out the box it can be on the road for just £5,699 which seems excellent value for the money. They suggested I take it for a test ride whilst my repair was being undertaken.

I am well accustomed to hopping on and off different bikes but with my short legs, 29″, many adventure bikes are a stretch for me. I often have to slide part way off the saddle just to reach the ground but the Benelli with a saddle height at 815mm was a comfortable reach for me. I’m sure this would prove reassuring to new riders even those with longer legs.

I felt immediately at ease with the bike. The saddle is very comfortable and the upright riding position is very relaxed. The windshield is effective although depending on your height it may benefit an additional deflector to divert air over the helmet. Although the bike with a full tank of fuel is quoted about 250kg it didn’t feel so heavy to me, it’s very well balanced with the weight lying low in the frame, so, I wonder if those quoted weights include the full luggage set because the bike I was riding had a full Givi pannier rack with only the top box on that day. Note that the Givi rear and side racks, screen winglets, crash bars and USB accessory power point all come as standard equipment.

For the technical minded the Benelli TRK 502 is chain driven twin cylinder with a displacement of 499.6cc and 6 speed gearbox. Remember that this bike is addressing the A2 market and so the maximum power is 47BHP (35 kW) at 8500 rpm and the torque is of 45 Nm (4.6 kgm) at 4500 rpm. There are twin disks front and a single at the rear. The front wheel is 110/80 R19 and the rear 150/70 R17.

I have to say that my first impressing was that the engine was rather lacklustre but I’ll try not to be critical of that because it only produces about a third of what I’m used to and apart from riding a Suzuki Bandit that had been mapped to 47BHP I’ve got little experience of riding bikes with that low output. I’m sure if this is all you are licensed to ride you will find it not only comparable with others A2 restricted engines but also preferable. I’d certainly far prefer to ride the Benelli than that restricted Suzuki. The TRK502 pulls well in all gears with smooth progression throughout the rev range. The brakes felt a little spongy at first but I soon adjusted to their feel by applying a bit more pressure. This is not a bad thing for inexperienced riders who might otherwise lockup a disk by braking too harshly. Although another pint of note is that being Euro4 rated it also has ABS as standard.

If Benelli made the TRK with a bigger engine I’d consider one because I think it would be a contender for the BMW F700/F800GS, Kawasaki Versys 650, Suzuki VStrom 650, Triumph Tiger 800, Yamaha Tracer 700, etc. I can also foresee it being utilised abroad for fleet hire touring due to its ease of handling, luggage capacity and economy. The Benelli TRK502 should not only be considered by younger riders with restricted licenses, it will also appeal to those who have a full license but uninterested in high speeds or want to keep the points off their licence as well as those who want a comfortable economic very well handling commuter because the Benelli TRK502 ticks all the boxes.

The Best Electric Scooters and Hoverboards – Is the World Finally Ready to Accept Them?

2018 it is deemed to be a lucky year for technology and for hoverboards in particular. After the boom in the past year, the popularity of this electric scooter is destined to grow more and more and to thrill adults and children.

Hoverboards can be considered both an entertainment device and a powerful way to move around the city.

In any case, model after model, the quality of the materials and the level of technology are progressing to being more advanced and with functionality always on the increase. Let’s see in detail the most relevant features of the electric scooter.

How and where you can ride an Hoverboard scooter?

Although it is seen more and more frequently, the electric scooter is not recognized today in the Highway Code and this will mean that it can only be used in private or urban contexts, as in shopping centers or inside of parks.

In any case, it is important to buy electric hoverboards that ensure the necessary safety for the user who uses it.

As happens now on any electronic instrument, even the electric scooter undergoes not a few imitations (especially of Chinese mold) and this can lead to the purchase of an instrument that presents a price of lower levels, but that could also go to the expense of safety and quality of manufacture.

Therefore, regardless of where a hoverboard is used, it is important that this is an approved instrument, that is, the UL2272 certification valid for Europe and the United States.

Even if you prefer to buy a used scooter, always check that it is approved and that it is not of Chinese brands.

But how do you use a hoverboard? Simple, it’s all about balance! Just lean forward to proceed and retract backwards to stop the instrument.

To be able to maneuver instead, just move the weight on the right foot or on the left depending on the desired direction.

This is possible thanks to the weight sensors positioned below the footrest. In case of difficulty then, on the web there are numerous videos and tutorials that can be very helpful.

Although the electric scooter is very popular with children, it is recommended for users aged 12 and over and under adult supervision.

How a mono electric skate is structured.

The description of a hoverboard focuses on two fundamental aspects: structure and technology. The scooter is composed of a central platform, on which to rest the feet, and two parallel wheels that can be of different sizes depending on the model.

It is important that the materials of the structure and of the parallel wheels are of good quality: the platform, for example, must have a suitable anti-slip coating and the body must be strong enough to withstand knocks and wear.

Some models of electric scooter have bigger wheels, so they can also be used on non-smooth roads and thus guarantee greater stability.

Regardless of the materials used for the construction, however, a single skid must also be light enough to be able to transport it without particular effort.

Generally the weight of electric hoverboards is around 10/12 Kg and has a speed that is around 10-20 Km per hour.

In addition to materials, other relevant aspects are batteries and engines. Generally an electric scooter consists of about 20 batteries, which are recharged in varying times (from an hour and a half to 3 hours) and that give an autonomy of 10/20 Km.

Even the autonomy can vary depending on the type of road you travel and the user’s weight. In fact, the maximum weight that an electric scooter can bear is for some 100 Kg, for another 120 Kg.

As for the engine, there are basically two that guarantee from 500W to 1000W of power. Of course, a scooter with 1000W engine is presented as a more professional tool and with a higher speed, less indicated then for do-it-yourself use.

Further features of the best electric scooter.

The technology is always evolving and the electric scooters, in addition to being a good invention in itself, are always enriched with new features.

For example, there are models that have some nice LED lights integrated, which intervene to illuminate the road in the evening but also to give a striking appearance to the walk.

Other additional elements can be the Bluetooth function, the speaker for listening to music and a comfortable backpack to make the transport lighter.