PBS Reports On Student Loans – A Leftist Slant Of Reality

As a conservative or right-leaning gentleman, I can sniff out leftist propaganda quite easily, and mind you, that’s not so hard, considering it is virtually everywhere in our society and has infiltrated our corporations, government and even our own families. Yes, everyone has their point-of-view (POV) on politics and that is perfectly acceptable – except for one thing, on the left it really isn’t someone’s actual POV, rather it is one of a brainwashed mindset from repetition, false argument and propaganda. Let’s take this growing and out-of-control college student loan crisis we are in today.

Did you know that nearly 50% of all student loans are in default or not a single payment has ever been made, with a huge chunk of the outstanding $1.35 Trillion — yes, that’s correct with a “T” — hasn’t shown a payment in over 7-years? We are told, or were told by the Obama Administration that employment is at an all-time-high, now at just over 4%, well then how come no one is paying on their student loans, not even small payments to stay at least in the game?

Now then, there is a YouTube video: “PBS Looks Into The Student Loan Problem,” on the Credit Care Channel, which goes on and on about how Sally Mae collection personnel are misadvising debtors to pay their loans before their rent, health care insurance or house payments, and how borrowers didn’t understand that it was a bad idea to do that. The 25+ minute video makes the student loan borrowers look like victims? What? They are not the victims, we the taxpayers are in many cases, as we are guaranteeing those loans, no not all, but a portion of them.

One estimate was that the taxpayers are on the hook for about $108 Billion of the already in default student loans, ouch. What do I think of this? Well, I think PBS, yes, also partly funded by the taxpayer is making things worse, and their documentaries on this topic are a very leftist view point, following the likes of Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders who basically told voters that if they voted them into office there would be forgiven student loans and free-college for everyone.

But, why does PBS make these borrows out as victims, they are not, they owe the money, the taxpayer should NOT bailout this abuse of our system by students, leftists in politics and students. Academia is to blame too, those know-it-alls claiming they care about the kids, BS they care about their pensions, tenure and leftist politics.

If these colleges would teach “Financial Literacy” along with other requirements to get a degree, maybe their students wouldn’t be such deadbeat consumers. Instead academia teaches leftist socialism, brainwashing students. Maybe, it’s okay if the college loan crisis debt bomb bubble pops, NO taxpayer bailouts… We have an academic university system out-of-control partly funded by taxpayers, as the tenured professors act high-and-mighty, but hide out in academia, never having had to make payroll or deal in the free-market.

If you don’t have a problem with those who’ve allowed this student loan debt bomb to lead to a crisis of epic proportions while the bubble is still building – then you are NOT paying attention. Think on this.

Continuing Education Is a Necessity – That Doesn’t Mean It Has to Be Tedious

Therapists who see continuing education as something just to get through are missing out. LMFTs (Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist) LPCCs (Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors) and LCSWs (Licensed Clinical Social Worker) are required to maintain current skills by completing continuing education (CEUs) requirements in order to renew their licenses.

This isn’t just a requirement, it’s an opportunity! These precious hours are time for the therapist to regroup, to recharge the batteries renew motivation, learn new skills and update established ones.

Online or Classroom teaching

Therapists can gain CEUs with self-study, online and live trainings and workshops. While it’s easy to see the appeal of online courses (convenient, on your schedule, in your jammies) “live” classes offer so much more than basic information.

Interactive learning

By attending live classes and workshops, therapists have the opportunity to discuss and get clarification, “try on” ideas with colleagues and see the material in a relatable, communicative way. Small groups are especially helpful when the opportunity to “learn it, see it, do it” is offered. This way of learning brings the material to life and offers practical and efficient ways of learning.

Meeting colleagues

Attending live classes also offers you the chance to network with colleagues while you learn together. Being a therapist can be an isolating experience, so talking with your peers, sharing ideas and community is essential. CEU classes provide an ideal opportunity to network, collaborate and educate yourself while contributing to the group as a whole.

Bring Theory to life

Live CEU workshops offer the unique opportunity to see material in action. Understanding a theory is great, knowing how to apply it is essential! As therapists learn and actually practice new skills, they contribute to the well-being of every client they see.

Don’t Put It Off

It’s easy to put off your required Continuing Education (CEU) requirements, but that leads to a rushed experience as your renewal date looms. Help yourself and your practice by getting those CEU dates on your calendar now. While there are legal minimum required hours, there is no maximum to the amount of learning from which a therapist can benefit. You don’t give the “bare minimum” to your clients, why settle for it in your CEUs?

Get motivated

Live classes allow you to be part of a bigger community that will support your work, motivate you to be stretch and that needs your contribution of energy. Online IS convenient, but it’s also one more place of isolation, and often, frustration. Get out of your jammies, go see your colleagues, and get excited about your meaningful and challenging work again!

How to Choose Your College Major

Bear in mind that whatever subjects you choose in college, you will have to spend a great deal of time learning it. So, it’s advisable to think over it seriously. Typically, the best time to decide on your field of study is right before your 11th grade if you haven’t already.

Here is a guide to choosing your college major:

Choosing a Specific Career Path

If you already know which career you’re looking forward to when you graduate, it becomes easier to choose your specialized area of study. However, before you decide that you want to go down that career path, look into the relevant discipline. Check out the syllabus and subjects you will have to take on. Talk to students in the department of your choice. Are you sure you’re ready for the coursework involved?

Future Earning Potential

Pay scale can be a major factor for students who are planning to take out a loan for their education. Trying to pay it back while barely scraping through, hardly makes sense when you have invested so much in college. Courses like Engineering, Actuarial Mathematics, Computer Science, Physics, Statistics and Economics lead to the highest salaries. That being said, your six-figure salary won’t be worth it if you’re not content with the career path you have chosen for yourself.

Favourite Subjects

If there is a particular subject that you absolutely love, then it’s a great sign that you have found your area of study. Proclivity for a subject can translate into better understanding of the subject matter and better grades. Eventually, you will be able to get into a job that truly holds meaning for your passion.

Explore Your Interests

If you’re not sure about what you want to study, exploring your underlying interests might help you find what you’re looking for. Talk to your teachers and advisors to help you find your best fit. Who knows? You may end up on the right track.

Double Major

If your knowledge for hunger is not appeased by a single area of study, some universities also offer dual degrees. Make sure to research about the university you are applying for and how much of a load it’s going to be on you throughout the semesters.

As for the fear that you may lose interest in a subject halfway through, there is always a possibility of changing your academic field. However, it may take you more than the traditional four years of study to earn your college degree due to the change of coursework and requisite subjects.

Home Schooling Six to Eight Year Olds

Whether a child has been to an institutionalized school or has been home schooled forever, many six to eight year olds enjoy learning. As a parent, understanding how your child learns, which temperament is their strongest, and what type of intelligence they excel in will greatly assist in the teaching/learning process. Six to eight year olds learn best when they are having fun. Reading to the child is essential to their learning experience. Read about a variety of subjects, such as animals, mystery, history, fantasy, classics, and adventures. Visit the library often and see what they offer. Some offer reading and art classes or other activities. Purchasing a phonics book will dramatically help your child to understand how words are phonetically read out loud.

Another lesson for this age group is writing skills. Although the child may have difficulty writing, they certainly can talk up a storm. Scribing for your child as they tell a story is a great way for them to see it written down. Have them draw pictures by the words that you have written for them. Narration is also a great tool to learning language skills. Read to your child and have them repeat in their own words what the story was about. Remember to keep all these lessons fun and stress free. Children learn at their own pace as long as there is daily practice there is nothing to worry about.

When working with arithmetic, try to incorporate a lot of real life situations, such as cooking, or trips to the grocery store, etc. Science is another subject that is learned best in its natural setting. Read about snakes and then go to a zoo to see some. Name all the animals at the zoo and then write about it later. See how many different birds are outside your home and try to name them. The hands on approach is often the easiest way to learn. Walk on the beach and name all the animals, hike in the mountains and notice the different landscapes, collect specimens, notice changing seasons, the world is a learning experience.

In addition, parents want to teach their children responsibility and accountability with household chores. This is an excellent way for child to learn that they are capable and that they are needed in the family.

Overall, children in this age group enjoy combining research with creative projects, such as crafts, costumes, foods, reports, place setting, home decorations, music, and imagination play. With every activity, each subject can be incorporated easily. A purchased curriculum is not necessary, learning is inevitable.

Future Education In The Age Of The Implanted Brain Information and Communication Chip

Not long ago, I was discussing with a future Think Tank member his concerns about how education in North America and around the world is not keeping up with technology, or ready for the future of computer-brain interfaces. This may sound like an esoteric topic, however when you consider the speed of these technologies, I am sure we’ve already all thought about how in the future, your smart phone will be nothing more than a brain-chip with full Internet Access that works with your organic brain in real-time. Want to send a thought, just think it, think about whom you’d like to send this thought to, and it’s sent, post on social media and you are done.

Want to learn a new topic, no need, you have instant access to all human information, and it will feel as if it is all in your own memory, just think a question and viola, you have the answer. My think tank acquaintance noted that we are a ways off from that future, and if the past is any indication of how we might handle that future, then we are in big trouble. Education is broken already, and it will not be able to adapt to something that different. He noted we need to fix all the rote memorization teaching, it isn’t working. And, I would submit to you that it will be even worse in the future, in fact; why memorize anything if you have full-time unlimited access to all the information ever created and stored in the cloud of humanity?

So what he is saying is that we have to teach people to THINK, not just put the students in rows, open their skulls and pour information in to them, which is what pedagogy has been for most of the 20th century and now to for a lot of this century. I of course agree. If we integrate the brain-chip or implanted information, or access to all human information in real time to the brain, it will only work if the human user has enough foresight to ask the right questions, and cross-pollinate the information in an innovative and creative way. This is something that humans are good at, when they practice it, and as of yet, AI computers are not so good at. Together (AI + human brains) it will be smarter than either on its own, smarter than today’s human and smarter than a future AI computer chip w/instant access to all human information to date and up on all new information in real-time.

The increase in IQ wouldn’t matter. Everyone would be super smart and retain unlimited information in the cloud storage device or set of distributive cloud computers around the planet. The best and most creative minds would use this information in the most novel ways, ask the best questions and have most of those questions answered to pose new ones. The speed of innovation would be so intensive that Ray Kurzweil’s “Singularity” theory would be realized in short order.